Science & Technology

Charging cars at home at night is not the way to go, Stanford study...

Most electric vehicle owners charge their cars at home in the evening or overnight. We’re doing it wrong, according to a new Stanford study. In March,...

Scientists install brains on solar-powered microrobots

Cornell researchers installed electronic “brains” on solar-powered robots that are 100 to 250 micrometers in size – smaller than an ant’s head – so...

Astronomers unveil new and puzzling features of mysterious fast radio bursts

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-long cosmic explosions that each produce the energy equivalent to the sun’s annual output. More than 15 years after the...

Life on earth might really have started with clay

In mythologies and origin stories around the world, various cultures and religions point to clay as the vessel of life, the primordial material that...

Why isn’t weed killer working anymore?

Farmers used to worry about weeds. Then, herbicides solved that problem. At least for a while. In 1997, there were 432 new patents for herbicides; by...

Smartphone’s camera and flash could help measure blood oxygen levels at home

First, pause and take a deep breath. When we breathe in, our lungs fill with oxygen, which is distributed to our red blood cells for...

New 3D printing process offers novel energy storage design options

Engineers have developed a process to print solid-state polymer electrolytes into any shape desired for use in energy storage. The research team from the School...

Is your gas stove bad for your health?

Cooks love their gadgets, from countertop slow cookers to instant-read thermometers. Now, there’s increasing interest in magnetic induction cooktops – surfaces that cook much faster...

Why Apple can hold the line on iPhone prices, as smartphones defy soaring inflation...

Inflation in the U.S. is surging to near a 40-year high, with prices on food, fuel and pretty much everything seeming to rise more...

Why do humans walk upright? The secret is in our pelvis

If evolutionary biologist Terence D. Capellini were to rank the body parts that make us quintessentially human, the pelvis would place close to the...

Why experts say lawns should become a thing of the past

Grass is under siege in the western United States. A new Las Vegas law requires homeowners to get rid of their lawns by 2027, and...

Why dark matter halos of ultra-diffuse galaxies are so odd

Scientists have found that dark matter halos of ultra-diffuse galaxies are very odd, raising questions about physicists’ understanding of galaxy formation and the structure...

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Scientists capture rare fast radio burst from faraway galaxy

Scientists capture rare fast radio burst from faraway galaxy

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are among the most enigmatic and powerful events in the cosmos. Around 80 of these events--intensely bright millisecond-long bursts of radio...

Scientists find new way to quadruple microbatteries’ energy density

Weighing about as much as two grains of rice but with the energy density of a much larger, heavier battery, the researchers’ packing-free design...

Scientists detect a supermassive black hole hiding in a ring of cosmic dust

The European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope Interferometer has observed a cloud of cosmic dust at the centre of the galaxy Messier 77 that...

This luminescent wood could light up homes of the future

The right indoor lighting can help set the mood, from a soft romantic glow to bright, stimulating colors. But some materials used for lighting, such...

This novel detector could help with early Alzheimer’s diagnosis

In a new study, researchers have developed a high-sensitivity detector that could help aid early Alzheimer's diagnosis. The research was conducted by a team from...