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New Mexico Mammoths among best evidence for early humans in North America

The remains of two mammoths discovered in New Mexico show that humans lived in North America much earlier than thought. About 37,000 years ago, a...

Scientists discover Ice Age human footprints in Utah desert

Human footprints believed to date from the end of the last ice age have been discovered on the salt flats of the Air Force’s...

Scientists find recycled glass in floors of 1700 years old luxury Greek villa

Although this 1700 years old luxury villa was excavated and examined both in 1856 and in the 1990s, it still has secrets to reveal. New...

Underwater jars reveal Roman period winemaking practices

Winemaking practices in coastal Italy during the Roman period involved using native grapes for making wine in jars waterproofed with imported tar pitch, according...

Human middle ear evolved from fish gills, shows fossil study

The human middle ear—which houses three tiny, vibrating bones—is key to transporting sound vibrations into the inner ear, where they become nerve impulses that...

Archaeologists reconstruct an ancient Aryan bow

A unique compound bow from the Bronze Age nearly 2 meters tall was reconstructed from authentic materials by SUSU specialists as part of an...

How new hi-tech archaeology is revealing the ghosts of human history

New details of our past are coming to light, hiding in the nooks and crannies of the world, as we refine our techniques to...

Why the Vikings left Greenland?

One of the great mysteries of late medieval history is why the Norse, who established successful settlements in southern Greenland in 985, abandoned them...

Prehistoric people created art by firelight, shows study

Our early ancestors probably created intricate artwork by firelight, an examination of 50 engraved stones unearthed in France has revealed. The stones were incised with...

Scientists turn to Neandertals, an extinct human relative, for the answer of lower back...

Examining the spines of Neandertals, an extinct human relative, may explain back-related ailments experienced by humans today, a team of anthropologists has concluded in...