Heart Health

Debunking cardiac rehab myths: Why some patients don’t go (and why they should)

Debunking cardiac rehab myths: Why some patients don’t go (and why they should)

If you’ve had heart surgery or another heart-related procedure, cardiac rehab is most likely an important part of your recovery. Cardiac rehabilitation is a medically...
‘Female gender roles’ make 2nd heart attack more likely

‘Female gender roles’ make 2nd heart attack more likely

Sex differences are increasingly being studied to assess symptoms, risk factors, and outcomes for various diseases, but a new study suggests gender—not sex—is a...
Eating chocolate every day protects your heart and reduce diabetes risk

Eating chocolate every day can protect your heart and reduce diabetes risk

Including a small amount of chocolate in your daily diet might help prevent diabetes and insulin resistance—and, as a result, protect the heart, too. Researchers...
Women and men share these 2 heart disease symptoms

Women and men share these 2 heart disease symptoms

Most women being seen by a doctor for the first time with suspected heart disease actually experience the same classic symptoms as men, notably...
FDA-approved devices that keep the heart beating

FDA-approved devices that keep the heart beating

Heart disease, also called “cardiovascular disease,” can have serious consequences. In fact, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women...
Don’t pull the plug too soon after cardiac arrest

Don’t pull the plug too soon after cardiac arrest

Survival statistics are grim for those who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital. Although about 50 percent of people who arrest are revived after attempted...
Needless shocks from heart devices can trigger extra health costs

Needless shocks from heart devices can trigger extra health costs

A team led by a Stanford University School of Medicine researcher has discovered that shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillators often trigger a cascade of...
Cardiovascular disease costs will exceed $1 trillion by 2035

Cardiovascular disease costs will exceed $1 trillion by 2035

Nearly half of Americans will develop pre-existing cardiovascular disease conditions A new study projects that by 2035, cardiovascular disease, the most costly and prevalent killer,...
Heart arrhythmia linked to smaller brains

Heart arrhythmia linked to smaller brains, study shows

People who experience atrial fibrillation (AF), a heart arrhythmia, may also have a smaller brain—specifically, reduced frontal lobe volume—a new study suggests. AF is a...
Early menopause could predict heart disease

Early menopause could predict heart disease

Women who experience hot flashes and night sweats earlier in life are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than women with later-onset menopausal...