Which of hazardous asteroid effects claim the most lives

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Which of hazardous asteroid effects claim the most lives
The trace left in the sky by the meteor that broke up over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in 2013.

If an asteroid struck Earth, which of its effects–scorching heat, flying debris, towering tsunamis–would claim the most lives?

A new study has the answer: violent winds and shock waves are the most dangerous effects produced by Earth-impacting asteroids.

The study explored seven effects associated with asteroid impacts–heat, pressure shock waves, flying debris, tsunamis, wind blasts, seismic shaking and cratering–and estimated their lethality for varying sizes.

The researchers then ranked the effects from most to least deadly, or how many lives were lost to each effect.

Overall, wind blasts and shock waves were likely to claim the most casualties, according to the study.

In experimental scenarios, these two effects accounted for more than 60 percent of lives lost. Shock waves arise from a spike in atmospheric pressure and can rupture internal organs, while wind blasts carry enough power to hurl human bodies and flatten forests.

“This is the first study that looks at all seven impact effects generated by hazardous asteroids and estimates which are, in terms of human loss, most severe,” said Clemens Rumpf, lead author of the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Rumpf said his findings, which he plans to present at the 2017 International Academy of Astronautics Planetary Defense Conference in Tokyo, Japan, could help hazard mitigation groups better prepare for asteroid threats because it details which impact effects are most dominant, which are less severe and where resources should be allocated.

Though studies like his are necessary to reduce harm, deadly asteroid impacts are still rare, Rumpf said.

Earth is struck by an asteroid 60 meters (more than 190 feet) wide approximately once every 1500 years, whereas an asteroid 400 meters (more than 1,300 feet) across is likely to strike the planet every 100,000 years, according to Rumpf.

“The likelihood of an asteroid impact is really low,” said Rumpf. “But the consequences can be unimaginable.”

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News source: American Geophysical Union. The content is edited for length and style purposes.
Figure legend: This Knowridge.com image is credited to Alex Alishevskikh.